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Parents Need to Know is a newsletter written by Craig Collison, MD, pediatrician with Mount Nittany Physician Group.
 
Beat the heat: keep your kids safe
 
 
 
  Child_Car Seat  

There has been a lot of media coverage lately on children deaths caused by heat stroke. Last year, over 40 kids died from heat stroke after being left in or having gained access to vehicles.

When a child is left in a hot vehicle, they become at risk for heat stroke. Heat stroke occurs when the core body temperature rises to more than 105 degrees. Symptoms include:

  • Red, hot and dry skin
  • Dizziness and nausea
  • Rapid heartbeat and/or shallow breathing
  • Seizures
  • Loss of consciousness

Children’s body temperature can rise three to five times faster than adults. Failure to get medical assistance immediately can result in brain damage or even death.

 
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Kids can win by playing video games
 
 
 
  Kids_Video Games  

As a parent, I’m sure you’ve heard time and time again about the potentially negative effects playing video games can have on children. However, a new study from the University of Oxford suggests that small amounts of video game playing can actually be beneficial to children’s emotional and social health.

Researchers evaluated 5,000 children, aged 10 to 15 years, and found they were playing one to three hours of video games daily. They also examined various behaviors such as hyperactivity, peer interaction, and overall life satisfaction. The results of the study indicated that children who played video games less than one hour per day ranked slightly more positive in emotional and social categories compared to children who did not play video games at all. Children who played video games for three or more hours per day were at higher risk to display negative social and emotional health behaviors.

 
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Mount Nittany Physician Group Pediatrics to offer Saturday appointments
 
 
 
  walk-in  

Beginning Saturday, September 6, Mount Nittany Physician Group Pediatrics will offer another new, convenient option for busy parents – Saturday appointments.

The appointments will be offered for acute patients (i.e., those experiencing minor illnesses/injuries) at the Mount Nittany Health – Boalsburg location from 8:00 am – 11:00 am. New and existing patients will simply need to call the office in advance (814.466.7921) to schedule an appointment.

Similar to the walk-in services the practice launched earlier this year (offered Monday-Friday, 8:00 am – 11:00 am for acute patients), offering Saturday appointments is part of the Group’s commitment to increasing access to care.

With more than 120 providers, 20 specialties and 15 locations, Mount Nittany Physician Group specializes in providing personalized care for every stage of life. Learn more today at mountnittany.org/physician-group or visit mountnittany.org/pediatrics.

 
 

 

 
Healthy sleep habits a must have for back-to-school
Written by John Solic, MD, sleep medicine specialist, Mount Nittany Physician Group
 
  Dr. Solic  
John Solic, MD, sleep medicine specialist, Mount Nittany Physician Group

As summer begins to wind down, new pencils, backpacks, and the perfect back-to-school outfit will soon replace swimsuits and flip-flops. As you prepare your children for the start of a new school year, it is important to remember that an established nighttime routine is also essential.

Preschoolers:
For children between the ages of three and five, between 11 and 13 hours of sleep per night is recommended. If your child repeatedly awakens during the night, poor sleep habits may be to blame. Nighttime fears and nightmares are part of normal development and are common for this age group. Sleepwalking and sleep terrors also peak during this time.

  • Develop a regular sleep schedule, where your child wakes and goes to bed about the same time each day.
  • Establish a bedtime routine that includes calming and enjoyable activities such as a bath and bedtime stories.
 
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Ask the pediatrician: Immunizations
 
 
 
  ask  

Dr. C,

I'm being told my kids need certain immunizations for school but I've heard that vaccines can cause other health problems. Which vaccines are really necessary and which can I have them skip?

All of the vaccines that are currently required by the state for children to attend school are from the official recommendations from the American Academy of Pediatrics and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). All of these vaccines are safe and well-tolerated and are very important to keep your children and the children around them free of these preventable diseases. Any vaccine can have potential side effects, and if any do occur, these are typically mild and short-lived. There are also some vaccines that are recommended but not required by the state, most notably Hepatitis A, influenza and HPV (Human Papilloma Virus) vaccines.

 
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Recent product recalls
 
 
 
  recalls  

Here are recent product recalls announced by the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission. For the most up-to-date recall information, please visit cpsc.gov and click on the Recalls tab from the home page.

Name of product: Dream On Me Dinah High Chairs

Hazard: The leg or side opening of the chair can allow a child’s body to pass through and become entrapped at the neck or fall from the chair. This poses a strangulation and fall hazard to young children.

Incidents/Injuries: None reported.

Description: The recall includes Dream On Me Dinah high chairs made with a steel, powder coated tubing open-framed base with white plastic foot grips and black with white trim or red with white trim fabric seats. The chair has a white plastic tray, plastic footrest and a white fabric five-point adjustable safety strap. “Dream On Me” is printed on a label attached to the front of the tray. There is a color-coordinated black and white or red and white fabric storage bin attached to the bottom of the chair legs. The high chair can be folded for storage.

 
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Table of contents
Ask the Pediatrician
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Please submit your question to parentsNTK@yahoo.com and look for the answer in future months for Parents Need To Know.
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