Healthsheet

Recognizing Depression in Children and Teens

Recognizing Depression in Children and Teens

Maybe your ten-year-old is the class bully. Or your teenage daughter ignores her curfew. These actions might be normal signs of growing up. But they also may signal depression. Depression is a serious problem in both children and teens. But treatment can help.

Woman is consoling sad girl.

What Is Depression?

Depression is a mood disorder that affects the way you think and feel. The most common symptom is a feeling of deep sadness. People who are depressed also may feel hopeless, or that life isn’t worth living. At times, depression may lead to thoughts of suicide or death.

Depression in Children

Children as young as age 6 may have feelings of deep sadness. But they can’t always express the way they feel. Instead, your child may:

  • Eat more or less than normal.

  • Sleep more or less than normal.

  • Seem unable to have fun.

  • Think or speak about suicide or death.

  • Seem fearful or anxious.

  • Act in an aggressive way.

  • Use alcohol or other drugs.

  • Complain of stomachaches or other pains that can’t be explained.

Depression in Teens

It can be hard to spot depression in teens. It’s normal for them to have extreme mood swings. This is the result of their changing hormones. It’s also just part of growing up. But if your teen is always depressed, you should be concerned. Other signs of depression include:

  • Use of drugs or alcohol

  • Problems in school and at home

  • Frequent episodes of running away

  • Thoughts or talk of death or suicide

  • Withdrawal from family and friends

  • Unplanned pregnancy

  • Hostile behavior or rage

  • Loss of pleasure in life

What You Can Do

Depressed children and teens can be helped with treatment. Talk to your doctor. Or check with your local mental health center, social service agency, or hospital. Assure your child or teen that their pain can be eased. Offer your love and support. If your child or teen talks about death or suicide, seek help right away.

Resources

  • National Institute of Mental Health

    866-615-6464

    www.nimh.nih.gov

  • National Alliance on Mental Illness

    800-950-6264

    www.nami.org

  • Mental Health America

    800-969-6642

    www.nmha.org

  • National Suicide Hotline

    800-784-2433 (800-SUICIDE)


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